IN THE STUDIO WITH CAMILLE EASY

IN THE STUDIO WITH CAMILLE EASY

Camille Easy is the Public Relations Director at The Lede Company.
Interview by Brooke Frischer
Photos by LaMonday Baxter, @lamonday on Instagram

Camille Easy in Jonathan Cohen's Lucid Magnolia Tunic Top and Fitted Skirt in Sunshine Yellow.

Camille Easy in Jonathan Cohen's Lucid Magnolia Tunic Top and Fitted Skirt in Sunshine Yellow.

HOW DID YOU FIRST BECOME ACQUAINTED WITH JONATHAN COHEN?

I met Jonathan through a mutual friend, possibly at a bar or at an NYC event, not sure of the year, but he’s been a close friend ever since!

FOR YOUR AT-HOME PHOTOSHOOT, YOU HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO STYLE YOUR OWN LOOK, WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THE PARTICULAR OUTFIT YOU WERE PHOTOGRAPHED IN?

Jonathan Cohen’s collections are always full of so much color and that's what really called out to me when selecting the specific styles for my photoshoot. The yellow high-waisted shirt in sunrise yellow, in particular, was a favorite of mine!

THE FASHION INDUSTRY IS CHANGING AT SUCH A RAPID PACE. WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES FOR THE FUTURE OF FASHION? ADDITIONALLY, WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE MOST EXCITING OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE OF FASHION?

Sustainability, diversity & inclusion, and what that means to companies in fashion has certainly changed for brands, some more than others. We have seen a few brands educate themselves on what these words really mean in terms of company values and how they engage with their audience. However, given the recent social and environmental issues, we also see that this is where a lot of companies have the opportunity to grow and impact what the future of fashion looks like, not just for them but for the generations to come.

Camille Easy in Jonathan Cohen's Lucid Magnolia Tunic Top and Fitted Skirt in Sunshine Yellow.

Camille Easy in Jonathan Cohen's Lucid Magnolia Tunic Top and Fitted Skirt in Sunshine Yellow.

EARLY ON IN YOUR CAREER, YOU INTERNED FOR CALVIN KLEIN IN PUBLIC RELATIONS. WAS PUBLIC RELATIONS IN FASHION SOMETHING YOU ALWAYS KNEW YOU WANTED TO DO?

To be honest, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do in fashion, other than the fact that I wanted to be a part of that industry and have an integral role. After working backstage at a few shows and seeing women in PR be in their element, it piqued my interest, and the internship at Calvin Klein is what really fortified it for me.

AS AN ACCOUNT DIRECTOR AT THE LEDE COMPANY, YOU OVERSEE NUMEROUS BRANDS ACROSS FASHION, BEAUTY, AND LIFESTYLE. IS THERE A MOMENT WITH THE LEDE COMPANY THAT HAS BEEN A PARTICULARLY EXCITING MOMENT IN YOUR CAREER?

In the two years I have been at the Lede Company, I have been very fortunate to have some great moments, so it is really hard to choose a particular one. I would say one of my first experiences with the company was a memorable one - the Savage X Fenty Show at Barclays Center. Being a part of that event, the cross functionality of the Lede Company departments and the overall concept of the show was one for the memory books. Also working on the company, Thrilling, and helping them to grow their brand awareness is something that I am really proud to be a part of. Watching the company grow during the two years I have had the pleasure of working with them, constantly reminds me of why I wanted to get into PR and support emerging brands such as Thrilling.

THE LEDE COMPANY'S CLIENTS SPAN FROM BRANDS TO A-LIST STARS AND INFLUENCERS. HAVE YOU SEEN A CHANGE IN HOW BRANDS PARTNER WITH CELEBRITIES AND INFLUENCERS, ESPECIALLY ACROSS NEWER PLATFORMS LIKE TIKTOK?

There has certainly been a shift in partnerships across brands, celebrities, and influencers. I think as consumers become more informed in the individuals they support, brands have to truly understand their audience and how these influential individuals may impact their business, whether it may be through organic or paid partnerships. The same can be said for celebrities and influencers, who as brands themselves, have to understand their reach through platforms, like TikTok, and how to grow that audience with certain brands. You also see a lot more celebrities taking bigger roles in the companies they partner with instead of just having their name and likeness used for a particular moment or collaboration.

WHAT WAS IT LIKE TRANSITIONING FROM A VERY IN-PERSON JOB TO ALL VIRTUAL IN AN INDUSTRY THAT RELIES SO HEAVILY ON EVENTS? HOW ARE THINGS STARTING TO CHANGE AS THOSE EVENTS BECOME IN-PERSON AGAIN?

The transition was certainly a challenging one especially in the beginning as there were so many unknowns. Not having in-person events was an adjustment not just for us but for our clients as well, but I think it allowed us to think outside of the box to find new ways to engage with an audience. We are slowly starting to see in-person events become more prominent but companies are certainly being more intentional with these moments to make them more impactful for their audience.

Camille Easy in Jonathan Cohen's Dress with Side Twist in Abstract Ranunculus.

Camille Easy in Jonathan Cohen's Dress with Side Twist in Abstract Ranunculus.

YOU TEAMED UP WITH THE BLACK IN FASHION COUNCIL IN THE SUMMER OF 2020, WHICH WAS FOUNDED TO REPRESENT AND SECURE THE ADVANCEMENT OF BLACK INDIVIDUALS IN THE FASHION AND BEAUTY INDUSTRIES. THE COUNCIL HAS HAD A GREAT AMOUNT OF HIGH-PROFILE BRANDS SIGN ON TO COMMIT TO BETTER AMPLIFY BLACK CREATIVES AT EVERY LEVEL POSITION. HOW HAVE YOU SEEN THE IMPACT OF BIFC IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY SINCE ITS FOUNDING?

I was really honored to be a part of their Town Hall back in March and share my experience with their audience. I truly admire and respect the work Lindsay Peoples-Wagner and Sandrine Charles have done with the BIFC and I know this is only the beginning for the council. The work they are doing has certainly helped to shed light on not just the issues and work the fashion industry needs to do, but it has allowed for a space for Black creatives and professionals to connect and grow their presence in this industry.

HOW DO YOU STRIVE TO EXPAND INCLUSIVITY AND DIVERSITY IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY? DO YOU HAVE ANY WORDS OF WISDOM FOR WOMEN OF COLOR WORKING TO MAKE IT IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY?

By being intentional with not just the work I do but the individuals I work with in the industry. You have to be an active participant in how to create inclusion and diversity in the spaces you inhabit, whether that is by suggesting creatives from different backgrounds for your clients to partner with or the individuals you choose to include in your network personally and professionally.

‎Being a woman of color in this industry is not at all easy, but having a great support system, whether that’s relatives or your chosen family, will be instrumental in helping you navigate these spaces and remind you of your worth and value.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO YOUNG PEOPLE WHO WANT TO WORK IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY BUT AREN'T SURE WHERE TO START?

Make the time for internships and informational interviews with professionals in the industry to truly understand what some of the roles in fashion entail. It’s also a great way to network and build contacts in addition to educating yourself on some of the skills you may need to succeed.

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